Appointment Info

Assistant Section Emergency Coordinator (ASEC)

Requirements: Technician class  license or higher; Full ARRL membership.

Responsibilities:

  • May serve as a general assistant to the Section Emergency Coordinator or as a specialist. That is, the ASEC may assist the Section Emergency Coordinator with general leadership matters as the Section Emergency Coordinator’s alternate, or the ASEC may be assigned to handle a specific important function that does not fail within the scope of the duties of the Section Emergency Coordinator’s other assistants.  The ASEC will act as the SEC in his/her absence or in emergency response operations to maintain continuity of leadership when 24 hour activity requires multiple shifts.
  • At the Section Manager’s discretion, the ASEC may be designated as the recommended successor to the incumbent Section Emergency Coordinator in case the Section Emergency Coordinator resigns or is otherwise unable to finish the term of office.
  • Should be familiar with the “Official Appointment Description for the ARRL Section Emergency Coordinator,” which contains the fundamental responsibilities of the SEC.
  • Encouraged to complete Levels 1, 2, and 3 of the Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Course.

District Emergency Coordinator (DEC)

The ARRL District Emergency Coordinator is appointed by the SEC to supervise the efforts of local Emergency Coordinators in the defined district.

Requirements: Technician class license or higher; Full ARRL membership.

Responsibilities:

  • Coordinate the training, organization and emergency participation of Emergency Coordinators in your district of jurisdiction.
  • Make local decisions in the absence of the SEC or through coordination with the SEC, concerning the allotment of available amateurs and equipment during an emergency.
  • Coordinate the interrelationship between local emergency plans and between communications networks within your area of jurisdiction.
  • Act as backup for local areas without an Emergency Coordinator and assist in maintaining contact with governmental and other agencies within your area of jurisdiction.
  • Provide direction in the routing and handling of emergency communications of either a formal or tactical nature, with specific emphasis being placed on Welfare traffic.
  • Recommend EC appointments to the SEC.
  • Coordinate the reporting and documenting of ARES activities in your district of jurisdiction.
  • Act as a model emergency communicator as evidenced by dedication to purpose, reliability and understanding of emergency communications.
  • Be fully conversant in National Traffic System routing and procedures as well as have a thorough understanding of the locale and role of all vital governmental and volunteer agencies that could be involved in an emergency.
  • Encouraged to earn certification in Levels 1 and 2 of the

 

 

 

 

Assistant District Emergency Coordinator (ADEC)

Requirements: Technician class license or higher; Full ARRL membership.

Responsibilities:

  • The Assistant District Emergency Coordinator (ADEC) may serve as a general assistant to the District Emergency Coordinator or as a specialist.  That is, the ADEC may assist the District Emergency Coordinator with general leadership matters as the District Emergency Coordinator’s alternate, or the ADEC may be assigned to handle a specific important function that does not fail within the scope of the duties of the District Emergency Coordinator’s other assistants. The ADEC will act as the DEC in his/her absence or in emergency response operations to maintain continuity of leadership when 24 hour activity requires multiple shifts.
  • At the Section Manager’s discretion, the ADEC may be designated as the recommended successor to the incumbent District Emergency Coordinator in case the District Emergency Coordinator resigns or is otherwise unable to finish the term of office.
  • The ADEC should be familiar with the “Official Appointment Description for the ARRL District Emergency Coordinator,” which contains the fundamental responsibilities of the DEC.
  • Assistant District Emergency Coordinators are encouraged to complete Levels 1 and 2 of the ARRL Amateur Radio Emergency Communications Course.

 

Emergency Coordinator (EC)

Emergency Coordinator’s Manual

The ARRL Emergency Coordinator is a key team player in ARES on the local emergency scene. Working with the Section Emergency Coordinator, the DEC and Official Emergency Stations, the EC prepares for, and engages in management of communications needs in disasters.

Requirements: Technician class license or higher; Full ARRL membership

Responsibilities:

  • Promote and enhance the activities of the Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) for the benefit of the public as a voluntary, non-commercial communications service.
  • Manage and coordinate the training, organization and emergency participation of interested amateurs working in support of the communities, agencies or functions designated by the Section Emergency Coordinator/Section Manager.
  • Establish viable working relationships with federal, state, county, city governmental and private agencies in the ARES jurisdictional area which need the services of ARES in emergencies. Determine what agencies are active in your area, evaluate each of their needs, and which ones you are capable of meeting, and then prioritize these agencies and needs. Discuss your planning with your Section Emergency Coordinator and then with your counterparts in each of the agencies. Ensure they are all aware of your ARES group’s capabilities, and perhaps more importantly, your limitations.
  • Develop detailed local operational plans with ”served” agency officials in your jurisdiction that set forth precisely what each of your expectations are during a disaster operation. Work jointly to establish protocols for mutual trust and respect. All matters involving recruitment and utilization of ARES volunteers are directed by you, in response to the needs assessed by the agency officials. Technical issues involving message format, security of message transmission, Disaster Welfare Inquiry policies, and others, should be reviewed and expounded upon in your detailed local operations plans.
  • Establish local communications networks run on a regular basis and periodically test those networks by conducting realistic drills.
  • Establish an emergency traffic plan, with Welfare traffic inclusive, utilizing the National Traffic System as one active component for traffic handling. Establish an operational liaison with local and section nets, particularly for handling Welfare traffic in an emergency situation.
  • In times of disaster, evaluate the communications needs of the jurisdiction and respond quickly to those needs. The EC will assume authority and responsibility for emergency response and performance by ARES personnel under his jurisdiction.
  • Work with other non-ARES amateur provider-groups to establish mutual respect and understanding, and a coordination mechanism for the good of the public and Amateur Radio. The goal is to foster an efficient and effective Amateur Radio response overall.
  • Work for growth in your ARES program, making it a stronger, more valuable resource and hence able to meet more of the agencies’ local needs. There are thousands of new Technicians coming into the amateur service that would make ideal additions to your ARES roster. A stronger ARES means a better ability to serve your communities in times of need and a greater sense of pride for Amateur Radio by both amateurs and the public.
  • Report regularly to the SEC, as required.
  • Encouraged to earn certification in Level 1 of the ARRL Emergency Communications Course.